Boring bureaucracy keeps the water clean

The U.S. EPA created the MS4 Program in 1990 to address the growing threat of stormwater pollution. In Minnesota, the program is administered by the MPCA and applies to roughly 300 cities, townships, counties, watershed districts, and large campuses such as universities, hospitals and prison complexes that operate their own private roads and stormwater drainage systems. This includes more than 20 permit holders in Washington County.

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Water stewards inspire neighbors to take action and adopt storm drains

To date, Twin Cities’ residents have adopted 13,747 storm drains. However, only 530 of those are in Washington County. This fall, the East Metro Water Resource Education Program is encouraging people to adopt a storm drain in their neighborhood and join the movement to promote clean lakes, rivers and streams. To sign up, go to http://www.Adopt-a-Drain.org.

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Brown’s Creek Watershed District to work with Oak Glen Golf Course on a new Clean Water project

There are three main goals for the Oak Glen stormwater reuse project. The first is to keep warm stormwater out of Brown’s Creek. The second is to keep phosphorus and sediment out of Brown’s Creek and the St. Croix River. In addition, this project will allow Oak Glen Golf Course to reduce the amount of groundwater it pumps for irrigation.

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Green days on a summer lake – and that’s not a good thing

Algae blooms in Carver Lake and other urban lakes are usually caused by too much phosphorus flowing into the water from sidewalks, streets, and parking lots.

Help to keep our lakes blue by sweeping dirt and yard waste off of your sidewalk, driveway and curb-line throughout the year and adopting your local storm drain: http://www.adopt-a-drain.org.

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Adopt a storm drain in honor of Earth Day’s 50th Anniversary

On April 22, 1970, 20 million Americans — 10% of the U.S. population at the time — participated in teach-ins and rallies across the nation to advocate for an end to environmental destruction. The event was organized by Gaylord Nelson, a U.S. Senator from Wisconsin, and was inspired by a string of environmental disasters, including…

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Cleaner Streets for Cleaner Water

Rain carries everything that lands on our streets — trash, leaves, grass clippings, automotive fluids, and even dog poop — into lakes, streams and wetlands via storm drains and pipes that run underground. Even so, many people think their actions don’t matter if they don’t live near the water.

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Groundwater and climate change: South Washington Watershed District prepares for new challenges

More water running off the land means less infiltrating down into aquifers; that combined with more people washing clothes, watering lawns and flushing toilets has resulted in declining groundwater levels in some parts of the watershed.

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Stabilizing the St. Croix River Bluff in Lakeland

The Quixote Ave. project demonstrates the importance of working collaboratively and using innovative approaches to address modern water quality problems.

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South Washington Watershed District adapts to changing times and new challenges

New development continues to be one of the biggest challenge facing the watershed.

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