A very hygge holiday?

Most often, you experience hygge with a small group of friends or family, possibly in front of a fireplace with warm wooly socks and a steaming drink in hand, but definitely not behind the wheel of a car, careening through rush hour traffic in the middle of an ice storm.

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New study finds that plastic pollution is pervasive in National Parks across the United States

Plastic makes up 81% of all trash collected in National Parks and federal lands.

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Mercury levels going down in Minnesota lakes

In 2020, the MPCA removed Forest Lake, Tanners Lake (Oakdale), Owasso (Roseville/Shoreview), Johanna (Arden Hills) and eight lakes in northern Minnesota from the state’s impaired waters list. This was the first time in Minnesota history that any lake or river recovered from a mercury impairment.

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Local lakes at risk of too much love

As shorelines become increasingly more developed, we start to see shoreline erosion, fewer fish and wildlife, more algae in the water, and diminished water clarity.

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Mysterious creatures of the St. Croix River

Bryozoans are just one of the many strange and unique animals that call the St. Croix River home.

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Volunteer to protect Minnesota lakes from aquatic invasive species

During Starry Trek, scheduled this year for Aug. 20, volunteers gather at training sites to learn how to identify starry stonewort and then head out to local water accesses to search for signs of the invasive species.

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Lily Lake alum treatment scheduled for May 19

The alum will draw phosphorus out of the water column and also seal sediment on the lake bottom so that the nutrient can no longer feed algae.

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Salt continues to pollute Minnesota lakes and streams

Once concentrations are high enough, the chloride becomes toxic to fish and invertebrates and can even prevent lakes from turning over the in spring and fall.

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The secret life of the St. Croix’s freshwater mussels

“The St. Croix River is a rare example of a complete and intact river ecosystem,” explains Marian Shaffer, an Aquatic Biologist with the National Park Service. “In fact, all of the freshwater mussel species that existed in the St. Croix Riverway before European settlement are still here today.”

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